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Travel Information

Read TSA Regulations online      Download PDF file
Read Baggage Regulations online      Download PDF file

TSA Regulations

3-1-1 for Carry-Ons

TSA Prohibited Items List Changing April 25th, 2013 - Small Pocket Knives and Some Sporting Goods Items to be Permitted

TSA established a committee to review the prohibited items list based on an overall risk-based security approach. After the review, TSA Administrator John S. Pistole made the decision to start allowing the following items in carry-on bags beginning April 25th, 2013:

  • Small Pocket Knives – Small knives with non-locking blades smaller than 2.36 inches and less than 1/2 inch in width will be permitted
  • Small Novelty Bats and Toy Bats
  • Ski Poles
  • Hockey Sticks
  • Lacrosse Sticks
  • Billiard Cues
  • Golf Clubs (Limit Two)

This is part of an overall Risk-Based Security approach, which allows Transportation Security Officers to better focus their efforts on finding higher threat items such as explosives. This decision aligns TSA more closely with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards.

These similar items will still remain on the prohibited items list:

  • Razor blades and box cutters will remain prohibited in carry-on luggage.
  • Full-size baseball, softball and cricket bats are prohibited items in carry-on luggage.

Visit TSA.gov for more information on small knives permitted in carry-on luggage and sporting equipment permitted in carry-ons. Again, please note these changes are effective April 25, 2013.

The Transportation Security Administration issued new security directives to all United States and international air carriers with inbound flights to the U.S. effective January 4, 2010.

The new directive includes long-term, sustainable security measures developed in consultation with law enforcement officials and our domestic and international partners.

Because effective aviation security must begin beyond our borders, and as a result of extraordinary cooperation from our global aviation partners, TSA is mandating that every individual flying into the U.S. from anywhere in the world who holds a passport issued by or is traveling from or through nations that are state sponsors of terrorism or other countries of interest will be required to go through enhanced screening. The directive also increases the use of enhanced screening technologies and mandates threat-based and random screening for passengers on U.S. bound international flights.

Q: What additional security measures are being taken for international flights to U.S. destinations?

A: On January 3, 2010, the Transportation Security Administration issued a new security directive to all U.S. and international air carriers with inbound flights to the U.S. effective January 4, 2010. The new directive includes long-term, sustainable security measures developed in consultation with law enforcement officials and our domestic and international partners.

TSA is mandating that every individual flying into the U.S. from anywhere in the world who holds a passport issued by or is traveling from or through nations that are state sponsors of terrorism or other countries of interest will be required to go through enhanced screening. TSA directed the increase use of enhanced screening technologies and mandates threat-based and random screening for majority passengers on U.S. bound international flights.

Q: Do passengers need to do anything differently to prepare for checkpoint security procedures? Has anything changed in terms of what passengers can bring in their carry-on or checked bags?

A: At this time, security checkpoint requirements for passengers departing U.S. airports remain the same. Passengers do not need to do anything differently, but they may notice additional security measures at the airport. TSA's checkpoint security screening procedures for persons with disabilities and medical conditions have not changed. TSA permits prescription liquid medications and other liquids needed by persons with disabilities and medical conditions.

In addition, TSA’s current procedures for the screening of bulky clothing or headwear remain unchanged. To ensure the highest level of security, passengers wearing loose fitting or bulky clothing - including headwear - may be subject to additional screening. In instances where passengers choose not to remove bulky clothing, including headwear, our officers are trained to offer a private screening area and may conduct a pat down search to clear the individual.

Q: Should passengers plan to arrive at airports earlier than normal?

A: Passengers may want to allow additional time to get through security on international flights bound to U.S. These times may vary by airport - check in with your airport or carrier.

Q: How long will these measures remain in place?

A: TSA will continuously review these measures to ensure the highest levels of security.

Q: What Can I Bring?

A: On Tuesday, September 26, 2006, TSA adjusted the ban on liquids, gels, and aerosols.

Air travelers may now carry liquids, gels and aerosols in their carry-on bag when going through security checkpoints.

The following rules apply to all liquids, gels, and aerosols carried through security checkpoints.

All liquids, gels and aerosols must be in three-ounce or smaller containers. Larger containers that are half-full or toothpaste tubes rolled up are not allowed. Each container must be three ounces or smaller. All liquids, gels and aerosols must be placed in a single, quart-size, zip-top, clear plastic bag. Gallon size bags or bags that are not zip-top such as fold-over sandwich bags are not allowed. Each traveler can use only one, quart-size, zip-top, clear plastic bag. Each traveler must remove their quart-sized plastic, zip-top bag from their carry-on and place it in a bin or on the conveyor belt for X-ray screening. X-raying separately will allow TSA security officers to more easily examine the declared items. There are exceptions for baby formula, breast milk, and other essential liquids, gels, and aerosols, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines.

Please keep in mind that these rules were developed after extensive research and understanding of current threats. They are intended to help air travelers bring essential toiletries and other liquids, gels and aerosols for short trips. If you need larger amounts of liquids, gels and aerosols such as toothpaste or shampoo, please place them in your luggage and check them with your airline.

To ensure the health and welfare of certain air travelers, in the absence of suspicious activity or items, greater than 3 ounces of the following liquids, gels and aerosols are permitted through the security checkpoint in reasonable quantities for the duration of your itinerary (all exceptions must be presented to the security officer in front of the checkpoint):

Baby formula, breast milk, and juice if a baby or small child is traveling; All prescription and over-the-counter medications (liquids, gels, and aerosols) including KY jelly, eye drops, and saline solution for medical purposes; Liquids including water, juice, or liquid nutrition or gels for passengers with a disability or medical condition; Life-support and life-sustaining liquids such as bone marrow, blood products, and transplant organs; Items used to augment the body for medical or cosmetic reasons such as mastectomy products, prosthetic breasts, bras or shells containing gels, saline solution, or other liquids; and, Gels or frozen liquids needed to cool disability or medically related items used by persons with disabilities or medical conditions. You are allowed reasonable amounts over 3 ounces of the items above in your carry-on baggage, but you will need to perform the following:

Separate these items from the liquids, gels, and aerosols in your quart-size and zip-top bag. Declare you have the items to one of our Security Officers at the security checkpoint. Present these items for additional inspection once reaching the X-ray. These items are subject to additional screening. We have also taken steps to ensure the security of the boarding areas after you pass through our security checkpoints. Therefore, any liquid, gel or aerosol, such as coffee or soda, purchased in the secure area beyond the security checkpoint is allowed aboard your plane. Please note that if you have a layover and are re-screened at your connecting airport the current rules (see above) for carry-ons apply. For more details, get the 3-1-1 for carry-ons.

To effectively communicate important security information, we translated these changes into a variety of languages. Security Information in Other Languages

You are permitted to bring solid cosmetics and personal hygiene items as such lipstick, lip balm and similar solids.

We ask for your cooperation in the screening process by being prepared before you arrive. We also ask that you follow the guidelines above and try not to over-think these guidelines. Please pack liquids, gels, and aerosols in your checked baggage even if you do not normally check a bag.

In addition to liquids, gels, and aerosols numerous other potentially dangerous items are not permitted in carry-on baggage. We strongly encourage travelers to read more about previously prohibited items to avoid complications during screening.

DISCLAIMER:

Rules and Regulations are subject to change at any time and you are advised to contact the TSA or your airline directly prior to your trip in order to receive all updated information.

Baggage Regulations

Carry On Baggage

The dimensions vary slightly by carrier and by aircraft type and layout. However, it is usually permitted to bring onboard an item that is 9 x 14 x 22. Most airlines request that this carry-on bag should weigh less than 50 pounds, when filled.

Additionally, most airlines allow for one additional personal item to be brought onboard such as a briefcase, purse, diaper bag, outer garments, or a small shoulder bag. This item MUST fit under the seat.

How much carry-on baggage is allowed on my flight?
 

Airlines have different policies for baggage allowances. Generally, you will be allowed to take one (1) carry-on bag and one (1) personal item (such as a purse or briefcase) on board with you. The maximum size carry-on bag for most airlines is 45 linear inches (the total of the height, width, and depth of the bag). Anything larger must be checked. Check our Airline Fee Chart for the airlines' policy and fees for checked luggage.

Checked Baggage - Domestic (USA):

The standard is as follows: less than 62 linear inches (height + width + length), usually a 29 inch Suitcase will work. However, each bag must also weigh 50 pounds or less, or a penalty will be assessed.

Each checked bag must have the name of the person traveling affixed to the outside of the bag and we recommend you have your name and address on a piece of paper on the inside or your checked bags, as well.

Checked Baggage - International:

The standard is as follows: less than 62 linear inches (height + width + length), usually a 29 inch Suitcase will work. However, each bag must also weigh less than 50 pounds (70 pounds on some international flights), or a penalty will be assessed.

Each checked bag must have the name of the person traveling affixed to the outside of the bag, we recommend you have your name and address on a piece of paper on the inside or your checked bags, as well.

Some checked items are assessed a special handling charge because of size, fragility, or other handling requirements. Examples are: Bicycles, Golf Bags.

Disclaimer:
 

Please contact the TSA or your airline directly as rules and regulations vary from carrier to carrier and can vary without notice